Botanic Gardens Trust, Sydney, Australia

See what’s blooming this month!

Each month our volunteer guides bring you the best of what's happening in our gardens. Find out which plants are blooming or are in the peak of their season for you to view.

Luculia pinceana

Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney

Luculia pinceana 
Pince’s luculia 

Etymology
Luculia: the Latinised form of the Nepalese name, Luculi Swa
Pinceana: named for Mr Pince, who raised the plant from seed in England.

Description
A branching and woody large, lush, evergreen shrub  growing to 2 metres high ; the leaves are elliptical, deep-green and prominently veined.. The flowers are arranged in open terminal umbels or corymbs, are tubular, pink, heavily scented, and vary in size from 10-20cm long; there are  5 spreading petals.

For more information on this variety, please open our detailed PDF

We have so many more plants in bloom this month in Sydney, open our Must See PDF and take a tour of the garden. 

Grevillea 'Honey Barbara'

Australian Botanic Garden, Mount Annan

Grevillea 
Grevillea cultivars 

Etymology
Genus: After Charles Francis Greville, 1749-1809, co-founder of the Horticultural Society, London, now the Royal Horticultural Society.

Distribution
Grevillea species are found predominantly Australia, with a few species in New Caledonia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

For more information on this variety, please open our detailed PDF


Eucalyptus boliviana

 Photo: Jan Allen

Blue Mountains Botanic Garden, Mount Tomah

Eucalyptus boliviana
Bolivia Hill stringybark

Etymology
Genus: Eucalyptus - From Greek, eu, well and calyptos, covered referring to the cap which covers the developing flowers.
Species: boliviana – commemorates Bolivia Hill, where this species was first reported. The area was occupied in 1840 by Edward Hurry who had lived in Bolivia in South America and was struck by the likeness of the areas.

Description
A small stringybark tree to 12 m. in height though sometimes a multi-stemmed mallee to only 5 m. Branchlets are 4-angled and glaucous. The leaves, dull green when young, become bluish-green and then glossy green with age. Flowers, in clusters of up to seven, form large, tightly clustered gumnuts. 

For more information on this variety, please open our detailed PDF