Botanic Gardens Trust, Sydney, Australia

The organisation

Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust

The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust (the Trust) is a statutory body established by the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust Act 1980. The legislation defines the objectives, powers and functions of the Trust and vests certain land and property in the Trust.

The Trust is responsible for the management and stewardship of the Royal Botanic Gardens; the Domain; Mount Annan Botanic Garden; Mount Tomah Botanic Garden; the National Herbarium of New South Wales and the New South Wales Seedbank.

The Trust also undertakes and provides scientific and horticultural research, together with advice and education on botany, horticulture and biodiversity.

The Trust is part of the New South Wales Department of Environment and Climate Change (DECC). On 27 July 2009 the NSW Government formalised the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (DECCW), effective from 1 July 2009. This report covers the activities of the Botanic Gardens Trust from 1 July 2008 through 30 June 2009, prior to these changes, and therefore refers only to the former Department of Environment and Climate Change where appropriate.

Our Mission

To inspire the appreciation and conservation of plants.

Our Objectives

The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust Act, 1980 defines the Trust’s objectives as to:

  • maintain and improve Trust lands, the National Herbarium of New South Wales and the collections of living and preserved plant life owned by the Trust
  • increase and disseminate knowledge about the plant life of Australia, and of New South Wales in particular
  • encourage the public use and enjoyment of Trust lands by promoting and increasing the educational, historical, cultural and recreational value of these lands. When acting in pursuance of its objectives, the Trust is required to give particular emphasis to encouraging and advancing the study of systematic botany, and to plant conservation.

When acting in pursuance of its Objects, the Trust is required to give particular emphasis to encouraging and advancing the study of systematic botany, and to plant conservation. 

Our Values

In all that we do, we value:

  • Our natural and cultural environment • Advancing, disseminating and using knowledge
  • A safe, healthy and fulfilling workplace
  • Excellence
  • Innovation and initiative
  • Achieving more through partnerships.

Our Estates

The Royal Botanic Gardens is an oasis in the heart of the city of Sydney, comprising 30 hectares of magnificent landscape adjacent to the Harbour, the Opera House and the central business district.

The Domain is a 28-hectare urban park situated on the eastern edge of the Sydney central business district. Its spectacular geographical setting offers extensive harbour and city views, as well as recreation opportunities. The park is used for leisure, sport, recreation and tourism, as well as special events, and is endowed with significant natural and cultural heritage values.

Mount Annan Botanic Garden displays the enormous diversity of our Australian flora. Covering over 400 hectares on the south-western outskirts of Sydney between Camden and Campbelltown in the Macarthur region, it is Australia’s largest botanic garden. Its location and undulation make it ideal for recreation and horticultural displays that contrast with remnant Cumberland Plain Woodland.

Mount Tomah Botanic Garden, in the beautiful Blue Mountains west of Sydney, is composed of 28 hectares of display gardens featuring one of the world’s finest collections of cool-climate plants, 10 hectares of pristine warm temperate rainforest in a newly acquired 33-hectare heritage property ‘The Jungle’, and a 189-hectare conservation area. It is the natural gateway to the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area.

cyathea
Mount Tomah Botanic Garden takes its name from the traditional Darug word meaning tree-fern. There are nine species of tree-fern in New South Wales, the majority from the genus Cyathea, chiefly found in moist gullies and rainforest. The genus name is taken from the Greek for ‘little cup’, referring to the structure that holds the spores.